STANDING TALL:  POSTURE
Sitting

Crossing your legs at the knee will encourage varicose veins later in life. Therefore, I
suggest that when you are alone or in an informal setting, do not cross your legs at the
knee. Sit with your legs flat on the ground. If you want to cross your legs, put your ankle
to the opposite knee. Some people think crossing your legs at the ankle is more lady-
like, but I think it looks immature.

Crossing your legs at the knee should be saved for important occasions: dates. Always
test a new outfit by sitting in a chair to ensure that it does not ride up your leg too highly
or that it is not too tight for you to sit comfortably. You will probably spend more time in
your outfit sitting, so it does not make sense to judge it solely by how it looks when youí
re standing in front of a mirror.

When you cross your legs, keep them still. Donít jiggle or tap your feet, donít swing your
leg to and fro. These are distracting motions, and will imply that you are impatient with
your company and want to leave. This is not a very polite message.

Use the same posture when you sit as when you stand: Donít slump or hunch your
shoulders; Keep you back straight and your chin up. Rest your arms either on the chair
or in your lap. Place your briefcase and purse on the floor, to the side of your chair so
they are out of the way and will not trip a passerby. Try to look relaxed and confident. If
the chair is too deep, causing your feet to leave the floor (this happens when designers
make seating for menís bodies and forget that women are generally shorter), sit only as
far back as you can with your knees against the cushion so you can keep your feet on
the floor.

If you are sitting in the floor on a cushion, itís best to sit with both legs to one side. Youíll
balance your weight on the opposite side of where youíve tucked your feet. This may not
be the most comfortable position, but it will enable you to keep your back straight. To
rise, ask for a manís hand to help pull you up.

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STANDING POSTURE


WALKING POSTURE


SITTING POSTURE